Cory a. Martin Faces Litigation

Jack Humphrey, Regulatory journalist
January 14, 2012 /

The Securities and Exchange Commission deems it appropriate and in the
public interest that public administrative proceedings be instituted pursuant to Section 203(f) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 against Cory A. Martin.

In anticipation of the institution of these proceedings, Martin has submitted an Offer of Settlement, which the SEC has determined to accept. Solely for the purpose of these proceedings and any other proceedings brought by the SEC, Martin consented to the entry of this order.

Martin, 34, was Chief Investment Officer of Jadis Capital, Inc., a
New York corporation, from November 2004 to December 2005. Jadis Capital
was the sole owner of Jadis Investments, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company and Uniondale, NY-based investment adviser registered with the SEC.

Martin received a bachelor’s degree in finance from Siena College and an MBA from Sage Graduate School. Martin has been registered with the SEC as an investment adviser affiliate and has held Series 7, 63, and 65 licenses.

On July 16, 2009, Martin pled guilty to conspiracy to commit securities
fraud, in violation of Title 18 United States Code, Section 371 before the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York, in United States v. Cory A. Martin.

On September 24, 2010, a judgment in the criminal case was entered against Martin. He was sentenced to 6 months of home detention, five years of probation, and 150 hours of community service, and was ordered to make restitution in the amount of $3,303,207.99.

The criminal information to which Martin pled guilty alleged that Martin, together with others, participated in a fraudulent investment scheme by mailing marketing materials in the Donum Fund, and by giving a presentation to potential investors, that contained materially false representations and omitted material facts about the Donum Fund and its investment manager, Jadis Investments.

In view of the foregoing, the SEC deems it appropriate and in the public interest to impose the sanctions agreed to in Martin’s Offer.

 

Share your opinion