Marked Downturn in Permanent Placements Led by the Capital in June

July 09, 2012 /

Lower permanent staff appointments recorded in all English regions bar the South, temp billings decrease in all regions except the Midlands, while North and London see strongest improvements in candidate availability.

The regional Report on Jobs series comprises four regional reports tracking labour market trends across the Midlands, the North of England, the South of England and London. The reports are designed to provide a comprehensive and up-todate guide to labour market trends and the data are directly comparable with the UK Report on Jobs.

The Report on Jobs is a monthly publication produced by Markit on behalf of the Recruitment & Employment Confederation and KPMG. The report features original survey data which provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive monthly picture of recruitment, employment and employee earnings trends available.

Permanent placements fell in each of the monitored regions bar the South in June, with London seeing the steepest reduction overall. The Midlands was meanwhile the only region to recorded higher temp billings, with notable decreases registered in both the North and South.

The number of vacancies available for people seeking permanent work fell in London during June, but rose elsewhere, with the South seeing the fastest growth. London also posted a drop in temporary vacancies,
while the South recorded a marginal fall. Modest increases were signalled in the Midlands and the North.

The Midlands and North saw modest rises in permanent starting salaries in June, with falls registered in the South and London.

The Midlands also saw an increase in temp hourly rates, and one that was faster than in the only other region to see a rise, the South.

Robust increases in the number of candidates seeking permanent jobs in the North and London during June contrasted with slight falls in the Midlands and South. The North and London meanwhile led a broad-based
increase in temporary staff availability.

 

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