‘Malware Risks Increased with Facebook, Twitter Usage’

Jay Decenella, IT audit expert
September 30, 2011 /

A Websense-sponsored global survey of 4,640 IT and IT security practitioners about social media and security in their organizations revealed an increase in malware that has been opened up with social media in a business.

Asked whether their organizations experienced any increase in virus and malware attacks as a result of employees’ use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter in the workplace, 52 percent said “yes” while only 23 percent said otherwise. The remaining 25 percent said they are not sure about it.

The other questions raised tackled the importance of social media in meeting business goals today, social media policies in organizations, and the security risks created by employee usage of social media tools.

More than half of the respondents from around the globe suggested that they’ve seen an increase in attacks due to employees’ use of social media in the workplace.

On the other hand, David Harley, a senior research fellow at security firm ESET, described Facebook as a “natural home of the hoax.”

“While I’ve seen the occasional traditional hoax/chain letter go whizzing past, I’ve seen nothing amazingly new,” he said.

“Then I saw this on Facebook. Well, this isn’t all that new either, but at least it’s mildly exotic.”

 

1 Comment for “‘Malware Risks Increased with Facebook, Twitter Usage’”

  1. I really think you should make it clear that when I described Facebook as the natural home of the hoax, I was talking about chain messages, virus hoaxes and so forth like the very specific hoax described in the blog you were quoting. Your taking that remark out of context makes it look as if I’m saying that there isn’t a problem with real threats involving access to social media. Of course there’s a problem with real threats, as I’ve said many times, and I’m not happy that you’ve taken that quote out of context to suggest that I’m disagreeing with the Websense survey. My blog had no connection with that survey.

    David Harley
    ESET Senior Research Fellow

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