IBM, WellPoint Working on Watson Healthcare Technology

Jay Decenella, IT audit expert
September 14, 2011 /

WellPoint, Inc. (NYSE: WLP), and IBM (NYSE: IBM) have agreed to create the first commercial applications of the IBM Watson technology.

Under the agreement, WellPoint will develop and launch Watson-based solutions to help improve patient care through the delivery of up-to-date, evidence-based health care for millions of Americans. IBM will develop the base Watson healthcare technology on which WellPoint’s solution will run.

IBM announced the agreement days after it signed a pact with 3M to develop the first adhesives that can be used to package semiconductors into densely stacked silicon “towers.” The companies will build, for the first time, commercial microprocessors composed of layers of up to 100 separate chips.

Watson, named after IBM founder Thomas Watson, is a computing system that rivals a human’s ability to answer questions posed in natural language with speed, accuracy and confidence. Earlier this year, Watson competed and won against two of the most celebrated players ever to appear on Jeopardy!.

IBM said Watson’s ability to analyze the meaning and context of human language, and quickly process vast amounts of information to suggest options targeted to a patient’s circumstances, can assist decision makers like physicians and nurses, in identifying the most likely diagnosis and treatment options for their patients.

In recent years, few areas have advanced as rapidly as health care. For physicians, incorporating hundreds of thousands of articles into practice and applying them to patient care is a significant challenge.

Watson can sift through an equivalent of about 1 million books or roughly 200 million pages of data, and analyze this information and provide precise responses in less than three seconds. Using this capability, WellPoint is expected to enable Watson to allow physicians to easily coordinate medical data programmed into Watson with specified patient factors, to help identify the most likely diagnosis and treatment options in complex cases.

Medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, chronic heart or kidney disease are incredibly intricate. New solutions incorporating Watson are being developed to have the ability to look at massive amounts of medical literature, population health data, and even a patient’s health record, in compliance with applicable privacy and security laws, to answer profoundly complex questions.

“For example, we envision that new applications will allow physicians to use Watson to consult patient medical histories, recent test results, recommended treatment protocols and the latest research findings loaded into Watson to discuss the best and most effective courses of treatment with their patients,” IBM said.

Sam Nussbaum, WellPoint’s Chief Medical Officer, said: “There are breathtaking advances in medical science and clinical knowledge, however; this clinical information is not always used in the care of patients.

“Imagine having the ability to take in all the information around a patient’s medical care — symptoms, findings, patient interviews and diagnostic studies. Then, imagine using Watson analytic capabilities to consider all of the prior cases, the state-of-the-art clinical knowledge in the medical literature and clinical best practices to help a physician advance a diagnosis and guide a course of treatment.”

Watson can help physicians identify treatment options that balance the interactions of various drugs and narrow among a large group of treatment choices, enabling them to quickly select the more effective treatment plans for their patients.

It is also expected to streamline communication between a patient’s physician and their health plan, helping to improve efficiency in clinical review of complex cases. It could even be used to direct patients to the physician in their area with the best success in treating a particular illness.

“With medical information doubling every five years and health care costs increasing, Watson has tremendous potential for applications that improve the efficiency of care and reduce wait times for diagnosis and treatment by enabling clinicians with access to the best clinical data the moment they need it,” said Manoj Saxena, general manager, Watson Solutions, IBM Software Group.

Depending on the progress of the development efforts, WellPoint anticipates employing Watson technology in early 2012, working with select physician groups in clinical pilots.

“The implications for health care are extraordinary,” said Lori Beer, WellPoint’s executive vice president of Enterprise Business Services.

 

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