Connecticut Attorney General Ultimatum: 5 Days Left for Google to Release Street Views Data or else…

Bob Styran, IT audit expert
December 13, 2010 /

Despite Google’s recent undertakings to reform its data privacy policies in United Kingdom, following complaints that its Street View cars collected emails and passwords, Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal has released an ultimatum demanding the search giant to turn over the collected payload data in his state until December 17, 2010.

Google has refused to grant access to the Connecticut Attorney General after his informal request prior to this ultimatum, Blumenthal said, adding that his office sought to probe whether Google has committed violations to state laws by determining the degree of confidentiality of the data the company has collected.

The search giant apologized for the data breach, saying it was inadvertent and has vowed to delete the payload data in the same undertaking signed by its senior vice president Alan Eustace. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) also closed investigation into the matter after learning Google’s implemented changes in its data privacy policies.

Google said in a statement that it never used the payload data, which it collected from unencrypted Wi-Fi networks in over 30 countries, in any of its products and services.

Along with the civil investigative demand that manifested the ultimatum released by Blumenthal, who is leading 40 other states in a concerted demand for investigation into the emails and passwords collected Google, the Federal Communications Commission has also been probing the possibility of Communications Act violations attributable to the data breach.

Blumenthal said Google may be hailed to the court if it would ignore the ultimatum and refuse to make its collected payload data accessible for investigation.

Other than the ultimatum released by Connecticut, which Blumenthal said was equivalent to a court’s subpoena, a Street View-related lawsuit has also been filed by California.

 

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